Category: Science

March is Endometriosis Awareness Week

Ella M., journalist

March may seem like any other month to many, but for millions of individuals worldwide, It’s a time to educate, advocate, and break the stigma surrounding endometriosis. March is endometriosis awareness month.  What is endometriosis? According to the Endometriosis Foundation of America, “Endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the inner lining of the uterus, also known as the endometrium, is found outside its normal location, where the tissue should not be.” Right now, there is no known exact cause or cure for endometriosis.

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To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate?

Katherine M., journalist

I interviewed Dr. Kris Morshedian, a nephrologist working in intensive care units of hospitals in Phoenix, Ari., about conditions in ICUs as a result of Covid-19 patients not getting vaccinated and about the vaccine itself. I went through a question and answer process throughout the interview, which is summarized below. The first question I asked was, “Why is it important to get vaccinated?” 

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How Safe Are Sanitation Products?

Diane K., journalist

Since the start of the pandemic, sanitation products have provided a barrier against the coronavirus for countless people around the world. As in-person activities increase close contact with other people in different environments, sanitation products have become more of an essential part of everyone’s lives. Due to this necessity, some people may wonder: how safe are they?

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Astro 2020: A 2021 Summary

Valene M., journalist

On Nov. 4, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened to determine the nation’s scientific priorities in astronomy and astrophysics and set the course for their development over the next decade. Truly a community effort at heart, this decision is the culmination of 867 extensive research papers on various disciplines in the field, many public meetings and discussions, and several smaller panels . In accordance with tradition, the finalized objectives were to be detailed in the 7th Decadal Survey for Astronomy and Astrophysics, which arrived this year in the form of a 614-page report titled “Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s” and nicknamed “Astro 2020” . Starting in 2023, the report calls for emphasis on three specific areas of astronomy, changes in the process through which major projects are mapped out and pursued, an expansion of mid-scale programs that draw on the community, and strengthening astronomy’s foundations through a unique focus on the people that support it. 

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The Wonderful Birds of the Saltmarsh

Caleb M, journalist

Salt marshes are among the most important ecosystems on Earth. They play an important role in the aquatic food web and protect inland areas from flooding by absorbing water. They are also inhabited by many creatures: crustaceans, fish, rodents and birds, to name a few. The birds in particular are fascinating, and their unique characteristics clearly display the natural wonder not far from many coastal cities. Three birds in particular, all a common sight in many coastal areas of North America, demonstrate this well.

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The Legacy of COVID-19

Claire D., journalist

The COVID-19 pandemic has dragged on for nearly a year now, and as we quickly approach the mid-March marker, the world seems to be holding its breath, waiting to see when life can return to the normal we once knew. Unfortunately, with the U.S. reaching over 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, we will have to find a new normal to abide by, one with smiles missing from our dinner tables. Herd immunity through vaccination is an ongoing, long process, from actually creating the vaccine to then transporting it, and to then getting it into people’s arms, and is not expected to be achieved until the fall of this year. As a nation, it is time to recognize that coronavirus will not simply go away as we had once hoped but will remain part of this world even after the majority of the U.S. has been vaccinated. 

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The Discovery of Gleis 486b and Why It Matters In The Search For Life, Habitability, and Understanding In Space

Valene M., journalist

Last week on March 4th, astronomers at the CARMENES consortium announced the discovery of the exoplanet Gleis 486b, a rocky and sweltering super-Earth. It closely orbits the red dwarf star Gleis 486 at 24 light-years from Earth, making it relatively close in the grand scheme of space. Although it is 30% larger than Earth and boasts about 2.8 times more mass, it is assumed to be relatively similar to familiar rocky planets like Earth and Venus in its makeup. It is even believed to have a metallic core. In fact, with a projected surface temperature of 430 degrees Celsius, Gleis 486b bears a notable resemblance to the searing Venus, albeit with a thin and insubstantial atmosphere. 

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How Friendships Have Changed During the Pandemic

Paige P., journalist

It has become clear by now that many aspects of life have changed pre-pandemic to the present. With lockdowns, social restrictions, and the rush of everyday life, many people have found it more challenging to maintain or make new friendships in the traditional sense. Now that much more socializing is done through the internet, many people realize differences in opinions, often political, amongst their friends, colleagues, and family. This has made people really think about the people in their lives they want to spend time and energy on. Throughout the pandemic, there has been plenty of time for self-reflection and contemplation on the people you choose to surround yourself with- do they build you up or tear you down? How do they make you feel about yourself? The answer to these questions should point you in the direction of your true friends.

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The Toddlers & Tablets Epidemic

Giuliana C., US News Department Co-Editor

Gen Alpha. The first generation to be born into a completely digitized world in which they are handed an iPad immediately after they emerge from the womb. They bring the devices to the grocery store, restaurants, and even the dinner table, glued to the screen and unable to look away as if the thousands of pixels set them into a deep hypnotic state. But this excess time spent attached to a screen comes with a price and even some side effects we aren’t fully aware of yet.

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