Category: Science

The Downfall of Fast Fashion and the Rise of Sustainability

Kathryn L., journalist

Approximately 15.1 million tons of waste was created from textiles in 2013, but the numbers have continued to grow.  The textile industry produces a large mass of waste every year.  The fashion industry has created and perpetuates wasteful practices such as using low-quality materials, poor environmental practices, and unethical production.  This has become known as fast fashion.  Switching to sustainable fashion can help our environment, the working conditions of the producers, and our future.

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How Palforzia Can Change Lives

Katelan A., journalist

On January 31, 2020 the U.S. Food and Drug Association or FDA approved a new drug called Palforzia. Palforzia is a type of oral immunotherapy using peanut powder that lowers the risk of anaphylaxis in people with peanut allergies. Linda Herbert of Children’s National Health System states, “The stress and anxiety as a result of food allergies is comparable to that of other chronic illnesses.” With the FDA’s approval of Palforzia, some families’ stress and anxiety may be put at ease.

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Not Just a Bee Movie

Ava P., journalist

When I was younger, I remember watching the Bee Movie and thinking how much fun it would be to be a bee. Flying, collecting pollen, having a close community, and living in a cool hive all seemed so fun. Of course, there were also the issues of getting lost easily, getting killed by humans and other animals, my hive being destroyed, trapped by humans, sprayed by pesticides… But at the time I was willing to overlook these things. However, the reality of a bee’s life does not seem as fun as it was advertised in the movie. 

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Nurses on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jillian H., Science Department Co-Editor

Automatic sliding doors blast a concentrated smell of hand sanitizer and icy air throughout each elevator and waiting room. Coughing, hacking, and wheezing greet most who walk in. Magazines are stacked neatly on tables, waiting for a handful of children to ponder through the pages. The clicking of small keys can be heard over the ring of phones from the receptionist’s office. The smell of gum and concentrated coffee meanders all around the lobby, as another child with a nosebleed stumbles through the shiny doors. A sterile atmosphere characterizes the beige and white walls and floors, all of which the harsh white light reflects upon, illuminating the sparkle from last night’s mopping. People of all ages lumber in, their current conditions plastered upon their faces. This was the everyday work atmosphere for most nurses. With the sudden introduction of COVID-19, many nurses now face a different harsh reality. 

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Are Bilinguals Smarter than Monolinguals?

Nyma E., senior reporter

Forty-three percent of the world’s population can speak two languages fluently. Bilingualism presents obvious benefits, such as being able to communicate with many more people. However, does being bilingual actually make one smarter? Bilingual people have a stronger executive function which results in a heightened ability to switch between tasks, a more efficient monitoring system, and a heightened cognitive ability. Adults aren’t the only ones who experience these benefits; infants, children, and the elderly can benefit as well.

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Coronavirus and the Environment

Emma D., journalist

Life before coronavirus is a nostalgic memory. While this pandemic has taken a toll on countless lives, the coronavirus has been quite a relief for the natural world. In the past few years, climate change has arguably become the single largest effect on the environment, resulting in Earth’s temperature rising “about two-thirds of a degree Fahrenheit”[1]. Even though the coronavirus pandemic has had a negative impact on human life all over the world, it has had an unexpected positive impact on the environment.

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Going Gluten-Free

Francesca R., journalist

In an Italian household, deciding to go gluten-free was going to be hard. However, given my allergy to wheat, it was probably going to be a good idea. Much like how people who are lactose intolerant are notorious for consuming dairy, I was an avid lover of bread and pasta. The idea of going gluten-free was entirely preposterous to me. But a doctor suggested that it would be a good idea in order to help my seasonal allergies, as well as possibly improve my sleep and performance in athletic activities, so I decided to give it a shot. 

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An Update On The Coronavirus Outbreak

The coronavirus, which was first detected in Hubei Province, China, has been declared “a public health emergency of international concern”, by the WHO. COVID-19, the official name for this disease, has infected 73,335 people, 72,438 of them being in China, killing around 1,873 in both China, and other countries, such as the Philippines, Japan, France, and Hong Kong. In the beginning of the outbreak, the cases had some link to a seafood and live animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. It has been discovered that this disease can be passed from person to person: the main reason for the spread inside and outside of China.

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