The 1920s- Looking Back a Century Ago

Beatrice Layton, Journalist     

 12 Dec. 2020

As 2021 approaches, many of us are looking to the future. Amid a pandemic and worldwide fear of what is to come, it’s hard not to hope for a better tomorrow. However, perhaps taking a step back into the past could be more beneficial. Enter the roaring twenties, when fashion and culture thrived and when change was imminent.

History and Facts About the Inauguration

Dylan N., Journalist

03 Jan. 2021

Every four years, the inauguration of the president happens and starts the 4-year journey for each president. The inauguration is a symbolic moment for democracy as it shows the peaceful transition of power from one leader to the next. It is a big moment for the US and exhibits the people’s choice for who should run the country. In this article, I will talk about the customs for the inauguration, its history, and some interesting things that have happened during them. 

The first inauguration happened back on March 4th, 1789, when George Washington was elected president at Federal Hall in New York City.  Since 1801, it has taken place at the  Capitol Building. The first inauguration started many familiar traditions, such as the oath of office and the inaugural speech. New customs have started more recently, such as an inaugural parade, congressional luncheon, and prayer service. 

There are lots of interesting and weird things that have happened during and around the inauguration. One of my favorites is that during Nixon’s inauguration, he requested that all the trees along his route be treated with a chemical called Roost No More, which would stop pigeons from flying around his route. The pigeons though, did not just sit on the branches but also started eating them, which led to Nixon’s inauguration being overrun by sick and dead pigeons. Another interesting fact is that William Henry Harrison spoke for over two hours in the longest inauguration speech. He then died a month later, and people speculated that standing out in the cold had led to some disease. 

During a Difficult Year, Taylor Swift Releases Two Excellent Albums: folklore and evermore

Ella Mordarski, Journalist

30 Dec. 2020

During a Difficult Year, Taylor Swift Releases Two Excellent Albums: folklore and evermore

By Ella Mordarski

In late July 2020, after a year of hardships, Taylor Swift released a surprise 8th studio album titled folklore. The album was a huge success and is nominated for numerous awards at the upcoming 63rd Annual Grammy Awards, set to air on Sunday, March 14th, 2021. These include Album of the Year, Song of the Year, Best Pop Solo Performance, Best Pop Duo/Group Performance, and Best Pop Vocal Album. If Taylor Swift wins Album of the Year at the 2021 Grammys, she will become the fourth three-time winner in the category in Grammy history and the first-ever female three-time winner of Album of the Year. Swift certainly had a brighter 2020 compared to most people, including other performers. So, the question is: how could Swift end such a successful year with a bang? By releasing another album, of course!

Biden’s Gun Control Plan

Claire Douglas, journalist

The Second Amendment, the right to bear arms, was ratified in 1791. In the present day, a shopper can able to click a checkout button online and have a gun delivered in a matter of days. With such easy gun access and a problematic background check system, America saw 611 mass shootings in 2020, with a total of 43,224 gun-related deaths. Simply put, in 2020,, there were more mass shootings than there are days in a year. President-elect Joe Biden, who will be  be sworn in on January 20th, 2021, has a plan to “get weapons of war off our streets.”

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GWUOHS Holds Decision Making Assembly

(Image by Ela Freeman)

Emma D., Arts Department Co-Editor

On Dec. 4, the George Washington University Online High School hosted an assembly on the topic of making good decisions. The lecture was presented by academic advisors Ela Freeman and Chelsea Crawford. While they navigated the audio glitches that occurred in Newrow, Freeman and Crawford provided students with advice on evaluating decisions. 

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Cabin Fever: What it is, and How You Can Avoid It

Beatrice L., Journalist

As millions of Americans stay at home because of the Covid-19 pandemic, you might have noticed that you’ve developed feelings of isolation, whether the longing for interaction, feeling bored or unmotivated, or even feeling yourself losing touch with reality. What you might not realize is that these feelings have a name. What you’re experiencing is an age-old phenomenon known as cabin fever.  

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Looking back on the November election

Lily McLean, editor-in-chief

The 2020 general election saw the spotlight turn, for the first time in many years, to poll workers. 

Poll workers are an often faceless class, invisible citizens who, motivated either by a sense of civic duty or perhaps the small stipend offered as a reward, stay at the polls from dawn to dusk. They facilitate a fundamentally democratic process, one that keeps the United States functioning as a republic. 

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The Prom: Netflix’s Campy New Film

Giuliana Carmen, US News Department Co-Editor

Warning: the review below contains spoilers. 

Live from Netflix this December, The Prom emerged onto the queue of the top 10 programs in the U.S. shortly after its debut. Directed by esteemed producer Ryan Murphy, known for his campy long-running show Glee and the frightening American Horror Story, The Prom fell nothing short of a typical Netflix original. The show stars Hollywood royalty Meryl Streep and Nicole Kidman alongside The Late Late Show host James Cordon. For a cast this universally admired, the film received alarmingly low ratings, with a mere 57% approval rating from Rotten Tomatoes and a 2.7 out of 5 star average on the film aficionado-dominated app Letterboxd.

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The Arecibo Telescope and The Legacy That Remains

Valene M., journalist

Guarded by three concrete towers, admired by the 900-ton observatory that hung so precariously over it, and equipped with shining aluminum panels to stretch its 1,000ft diameter, the Arecibo Telescope was a colossal structure, both in physical size and historical significance. For 57 years, this giant, which was the world’s largest radio telescope until recently, proved itself an invaluable center for radio astronomy as it mapped planets, guided spacecrafts, tracked asteroids, and searched for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence. This last August, its end began when one of 18 cables suspending its hovering observatory slipped and crashed into the panels at the edge of the dish. The damage then was not irreparable, but on November 6th, another cable snapped in half and gouged the center of the dish. With two cables out of commission, the platform above it was in danger of falling at any moment, making repair too dangerous to attempt. The National Science Foundation closed the dish permanently and prepared for its controlled demolition. Then on December 1st, the platform and the 900 tons of instruments that it held came crashing down, sealing the telescope’s fate.

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