Personal Finance Should Be Required

Emma D., Arts Department Co-Editor

Word Cloud by www.epictop10.com

Taking my high school’s Personal Finance course last semester was one of the best decisions I ever made. Although I was apprehensive about approaching a subject I knew little about at first, I now find myself having acquired a high level of financial literacy. I know how to create a budget, open a bank account, calculate interest, read a stock table and much more. These are skills that will serve me throughout my entire life, especially as I head off to college later this year. 

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GWUOHS Model United Nations Club Members Shine during April 18 Virtual MUN Conference

GW Chronicle,

On Sunday, April 18th, GWUOHS student delegates participated in a Virtual Model United Nations Conference with hundreds of students across the globe. MUN is an educational simulation in which students can learn about international relations, diplomacy, and the United Nations.

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I Am AMERICAN

Julian-Alexandre W., Opinion Editor

As a fourth-generation American of Asian descent, I find it preposterous that I have to justify how American I am. With the insurgence of Asian hate crimes across the nation, which started with the pandemic to the atrocious shootings in Atlanta, the reported attacks are close to 3,000 incidents. As much as I don’t feel the flight, I am undeniably forced to hear the rhetoric of my people. As many in the Asian and AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) community now live disrupted in fear, doubt, and anger, the stigma of being foreign is painfully real.

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The San Francisco Solution

Lily McLean, editor-in-chief

The San Francisco Unified School District has many problems, but the one it has chosen to target in recent weeks is the issue of whether or not the names of various schools should be changed to address issues of racism. The School Board’s answer? Yes, they should

As SFUSD’s 57,000 students continue to learn from a distance, the Board has announced a plan to rename 44 of its schools. In a widely-shared spreadsheet, anonymous contributors have shared notes on the rationale for renaming schools, from Abraham Lincoln High to El Dorado Elementary.

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A Lack Positive LGBTQ+ Representation in Modern Television

Kathryn Loschert, journalist

Television has become one of the most common American pastimes. Whether this means watching an episode of your favorite TV show or finding a new show to watch over the weekend, most people would agree that television is a strong part of their lives.  Despite the variety of shows available, the casts tend to be similar.  They lack diversity, especially characters who are members of the LGBTQ+ community.  It is important for us to increase television representation to educate audiences and give representation to minority groups.

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Why Your Smoke Alarms May Not Go Off During a House Fire

Paige Putnam, journalist

Note: This topic is very important to me, as I recently experienced a significant house fire and our smoke alarms did not go off. 

Take a moment and think to yourself: when was the last time you checked the batteries of the smoke alarms in your home? Did you ever wonder if by some off chance they may not go off if your house was on fire, even with brand new batteries? Believe it or not, this does happen, and more often than you might think. There are actually two different types of smoke detectors, ionization detectors, and photoelectric detectors. Ionization smoke detectors detect particles of fast-paced open flame fires and photoelectric detectors detect smoke particles from fires that smolder for a long period of time before turning into open flames. Depending on where in a house a fire starts, how fast it spreads, and the type of fire it is, it could take up to hours to see or smell smoke. If smoke alarms do go off, individuals will often see or smell smoke before they hear the alarm. The type of fire alarm and its location in a house also affects the likelihood of whether it will go off or not.

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The Educational and Developmental Importance of Having Creative Outlets

Maya Tuckman, journalist

Skills like mathematics, writing and literature, science, history, and geography are considered a fundamental part of functioning in the “real world” because of their practical applications and are therefore an essential part of the educational system. However, the significance of creative programs is frequently overlooked, and sometimes even belittled. Many struggle to recognize the essential role that creative outlets and crafts play in both development and education.

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The Psychological Impact of COVID-19

Maya Tuckman, journalist

While the health, economic, and social impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic appear to be the most urgent issues in current global society, mental health risks during quarantine isolation, loss of loved ones, and other financial, social, and familial struggles exemplify a rising personal conflict. Stress and isolation evoke unusually harmful psychological consequences that, since the start of lockdown, have progressively exacerbated the condition of nationwide mental health and intensified negative circumstances for those already struggling with mental illnesses like anxiety, addiction, depression, and more.

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Influential Women in STEM

Jillian Haskin, Science Department Co-Editor

Historically considered as male-dominated, the STEM field has received more popularity recently due to the recognition of more women who have pioneered the way for a diverse community of women nationwide and promoted encouragement through scientific engagement. More women have been highlighted for their intricate work and persistence in the revolutionizing of science, crushing the stigma that surrounds the history of the STEM field. This has led to the emergence of the term ‘women in STEM.’ From unveiling the structure of DNA to finding a cure for seemingly unpreventable illnesses despite minimum recognition, women have shared many complex discoveries that prove the scientific community is one anyone can enter.

Breaking gender stereotypes and transforming the birth of innovation nationwide, the accomplishments of these women are one of the main reasons we can coexist today with the help of technology.

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Meet the Uterus: A Conversation About Childbirth and Female Reproduction

Nastia G., Arts Department Co-Editor

The female body is a taboo topic. In ancient times, women’s bodies symbolized the purest of entities. The female anatomy was supposed to be mysterious, sophisticated, and beautiful. Men and women knew little of reproductive anatomy, and most early diagrams of these systems were abstract. Until the 1960s, most men and women were not educated in schools about the construct of their own bodies, and many never received proper sexual education at all. In the present day, more than half of the United States, including the District of Columbia, do not require sexual education to be taught in public schools. Despite the lack of proper anatomical education, there are dozens of slang words for different female body parts, most of them used as insults against men as a means of degrading them.

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