Category: Feature

When the Founding Fathers Fail Us

Giuliana Carmen, US News Co-Editor

The electoral college was founded in 1787, as the result of a compromise made because of the opposing beliefs of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention. Those who were for the implementation of the electoral college system feared that voters didn’t possess enough knowledge about each candidate to make a valid and educated decision and that they were not worthy of holding the power of directly deciding who would become president. In my view, this was the beginning of the corruption of democracy in the United States, as a system was created to limit the power of the people and their voices. The creation of this system begs the question: why were some delegates so desperate to suppress the opinions of voters in America?

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“Live From New York: It’s Saturday Night!” — SNL is Back

Nastia G., Arts Department Co-Editor

In March, coronavirus swept through the world, leaving a destructive trail in its wake. Auditoriums, professional theaters, cinemas, and art galleries were forced to close down to prevent the spread of the virus, as the threat of exposure was high in tightly packed spaces such as these. The arts were essentially forced to shut down. For many, the only way to see other people and stay entertained was through cable television, Netflix, YouTube, and TikTok. While networks and media companies worked tirelessly to provide viewers with sufficient amusement with which to stay busy when the world shut down, this task proved far more difficult than most realize. Even the most well-known television series struggled to deliver entertainment with new episodes. Many networks placed strict COVID-19 regulations in studios to keep actors, technicians, and directors safe. Most shows were postponed until further notice. Live shows faced a particularly brutal beating. To survive, many live shows continued to air from hosts’ and guest stars’ homes via Zoom or Skype. Saturday Night Live’s 45th season ended in sketches recorded and designed by the stars from their own living rooms.

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Nurses on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jillian H., Science Department Co-Editor

Automatic sliding doors blast a concentrated smell of hand sanitizer and icy air throughout each elevator and waiting room. Coughing, hacking, and wheezing greet most who walk in. Magazines are stacked neatly on tables, waiting for a handful of children to ponder through the pages. The clicking of small keys can be heard over the ring of phones from the receptionist’s office. The smell of gum and concentrated coffee meanders all around the lobby, as another child with a nosebleed stumbles through the shiny doors. A sterile atmosphere characterizes the beige and white walls and floors, all of which the harsh white light reflects upon, illuminating the sparkle from last night’s mopping. People of all ages lumber in, their current conditions plastered upon their faces. This was the everyday work atmosphere for most nurses. With the sudden introduction of COVID-19, many nurses now face a different harsh reality. 

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Pro-Democracy Protests in Thailand Turn Violent

Nyma E., Global News Department Co-Editor

BANGKOK–Protests in Thailand have been escalating since they began on October 6. More violence has been breaking out between opposing groups, which has led to very grim consequences. Many believe that if violence and rioting ensue, the future of Thailand could be very dark. 

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The Electoral College

Claire D., journalist

Every four years in the United States of America, citizens attempt to secure the role of the nation’s leader. These elections are a two-step process, beginning with the popular vote, and ultimately decided by the Electoral College. In 2020, the popular vote, in which registered US voters cast their ballots marked with the name of the candidate they believe is fit to lead the country, takes place on November 3rd, only to be followed on December 14th by the electoral vote. What does this really mean, and how does the popular vote as well as the electoral college affect the election?

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How COVID-19 has affected students

Lily McLean, editor

This article was completed on April 16th and many of the students polled submitted their answers as early as mid-March. Some information will not be current due to the rapidly changing nature of the situation.

On March 16th, 2020, it was announced that millions of Californians, spread across several counties, would be required to shelter in place in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. At the drop of a hat, everything changed. Businesses closed, people lost their jobs, and everywhere, citizens were contemplating the prospect of being trapped within their homes for an indefinite period of time. Governor Gavin Newsom extended this order three days later to cover the entire state. Since then, 45 states have announced at least partial shelter-in-place orders, putting normal American life on hold. As the coronavirus spreads throughout the United States, news outlets have covered the myriad of ways it affects citizens, from record numbers of people filing for unemployment to a dangerous shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). In this article, we give students the chance to explain how they have been affected by the coronavirus in their own words.

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A Look into the COVID-19 Effects on Refugees

Alexa W., journalist

In times of stress or uncertainty, most people tend to look toward humor as a coping mechanism.  Such remains true of the response to the coronavirus which currently affects the entire world. Although making jokes and poking fun at the disease helps to lighten the mood and make the situation more bearable, it remains important to consider some of the more serious matters at hand amidst the pandemic.

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Reducing Trash

The Circular Economy

Nyma E., journalist

As our planet faces an environmental crisis, many people are wondering what can be done to save the environment. The answer is not a simple one, but one that will take time and effort to implement. Switching to a circular economy could possibly solve the environmental crisis, however, it would be a long process. 

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The Economic Effects of COVID-19

Arya S., journalist

On February 18th Oxford Economics estimated that the coronavirus would cost the global economy more than one trillion dollars. If the virus were to be declared a pandemic today, most governments would be happy to take a trillion dollar loss since most corporations and notable investors—such as Ray Dailo—estimate that corporate losses would hit four trillion dollars in the US alone. 

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“I don’t see color”

Aala S., journalist

“Oh, I don’t see color!” How many times have we heard this sentence before? Usually, when people say this, their intentions are good. What they mean to say is “I do not judge a person based on the color of their skin.” They believe that they are sending a message, which is that we are all equal. What they do not realize is these two different statements are perceived differently by others, since racial issues are very sensitive subjects for many. In order to understand why the historical context is important, and why pretending not to see color is not helpful, we must also understand why some people say this.

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