Category: Feature

GWUOHS Model United Nations Club Members Shine during April 18 Virtual MUN Conference

GW Chronicle,

On Sunday, April 18th, GWUOHS student delegates participated in a Virtual Model United Nations Conference with hundreds of students across the globe. MUN is an educational simulation in which students can learn about international relations, diplomacy, and the United Nations.

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Satellite Mega-Constellations, Hampered Science, and a Cluttered Orbit

Valene McInerney, journalist

Long ago, people would look to the night sky and observe only natural celestial bodies. Artificial lights did not blot and blur their sights, and human-made satellites did not crowd their horizons. Both of these phenomena factor into modern astronomy, but it has only been in the past 19 months that satellites have become a threat to astronomical observation. With the recent surge in satellite launches and the construction of satellite mega-constellations, hobbyists and professional astronomers alike are witnessing what can be a dangerous disruption and distortion of their cosmic viewing. 

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Mankind’s Crucible: What Arthur Miller’s 1953 Masterpiece Taught Us

Nastia Goddard, Arts Department Co-Editor

The Crucible is one of those titles that almost everyone is familiar with or has at least heard of- and for a good reason. Arthur Miller’s 20th-century classic drama tells a brazenly timeless story, though few truly recognize its candid relevance in the modern world. As society becomes increasingly polarized in the digital age, it is easy to brush off the lessons of the past as inapplicable historical lectures. Such thinking is inherently flawed: how can we move forward if we refuse to acknowledge our past? The answers to some of today’s most pressing questions may lie in the text of a play that most high schoolers begrudgingly skim.

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Women Face the Brunt of Unemployment, Making Up 100% of Job Losses in December

Danielle Chan, Newsletter Co-Editor

The Covid-19 pandemic has driven many out of the workforce and into unemployment. Despite both men and women facing a drastic loss of jobs and economic instability, women have been disproportionately taking a much more devastating hit in the labor force. As opposed to the Great Recession, in which 70% of men working primarily in manufacturing and construction industries lost their jobs, the economic and financial crisis created by the pandemic is nearly two times as worse as what America faced from 2007-2009.

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When the Founding Fathers Fail Us

Giuliana Carmen, US News Co-Editor

The electoral college was founded in 1787, as the result of a compromise made because of the opposing beliefs of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention. Those who were for the implementation of the electoral college system feared that voters didn’t possess enough knowledge about each candidate to make a valid and educated decision and that they were not worthy of holding the power of directly deciding who would become president. In my view, this was the beginning of the corruption of democracy in the United States, as a system was created to limit the power of the people and their voices. The creation of this system begs the question: why were some delegates so desperate to suppress the opinions of voters in America?

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“Live From New York: It’s Saturday Night!” — SNL is Back

Nastia G., Arts Department Co-Editor

In March, coronavirus swept through the world, leaving a destructive trail in its wake. Auditoriums, professional theaters, cinemas, and art galleries were forced to close down to prevent the spread of the virus, as the threat of exposure was high in tightly packed spaces such as these. The arts were essentially forced to shut down. For many, the only way to see other people and stay entertained was through cable television, Netflix, YouTube, and TikTok. While networks and media companies worked tirelessly to provide viewers with sufficient amusement with which to stay busy when the world shut down, this task proved far more difficult than most realize. Even the most well-known television series struggled to deliver entertainment with new episodes. Many networks placed strict COVID-19 regulations in studios to keep actors, technicians, and directors safe. Most shows were postponed until further notice. Live shows faced a particularly brutal beating. To survive, many live shows continued to air from hosts’ and guest stars’ homes via Zoom or Skype. Saturday Night Live’s 45th season ended in sketches recorded and designed by the stars from their own living rooms.

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Nurses on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jillian H., Science Department Co-Editor

Automatic sliding doors blast a concentrated smell of hand sanitizer and icy air throughout each elevator and waiting room. Coughing, hacking, and wheezing greet most who walk in. Magazines are stacked neatly on tables, waiting for a handful of children to ponder through the pages. The clicking of small keys can be heard over the ring of phones from the receptionist’s office. The smell of gum and concentrated coffee meanders all around the lobby, as another child with a nosebleed stumbles through the shiny doors. A sterile atmosphere characterizes the beige and white walls and floors, all of which the harsh white light reflects upon, illuminating the sparkle from last night’s mopping. People of all ages lumber in, their current conditions plastered upon their faces. This was the everyday work atmosphere for most nurses. With the sudden introduction of COVID-19, many nurses now face a different harsh reality. 

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Pro-Democracy Protests in Thailand Turn Violent

Nyma E., Global News Department Co-Editor

BANGKOK–Protests in Thailand have been escalating since they began on October 6. More violence has been breaking out between opposing groups, which has led to very grim consequences. Many believe that if violence and rioting ensue, the future of Thailand could be very dark. 

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The Electoral College

Claire D., journalist

Every four years in the United States of America, citizens attempt to secure the role of the nation’s leader. These elections are a two-step process, beginning with the popular vote, and ultimately decided by the Electoral College. In 2020, the popular vote, in which registered US voters cast their ballots marked with the name of the candidate they believe is fit to lead the country, takes place on November 3rd, only to be followed on December 14th by the electoral vote. What does this really mean, and how does the popular vote as well as the electoral college affect the election?

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