Category: Miscellaneous

GWUOHS Holds Decision Making Assembly

(Image by Ela Freeman)

Emma D., Arts Department Co-Editor

On Dec. 4, the George Washington University Online High School hosted an assembly on the topic of making good decisions. The lecture was presented by academic advisors Ela Freeman and Chelsea Crawford. While they navigated the audio glitches that occurred in Newrow, Freeman and Crawford provided students with advice on evaluating decisions. 

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Cabin Fever: What it is, and How You Can Avoid It

Beatrice L., Journalist

As millions of Americans stay at home because of the Covid-19 pandemic, you might have noticed that you’ve developed feelings of isolation, whether the longing for interaction, feeling bored or unmotivated, or even feeling yourself losing touch with reality. What you might not realize is that these feelings have a name. What you’re experiencing is an age-old phenomenon known as cabin fever.  

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It’s Christmas Time In The City

Ava P., journalist

Bright colors light up a green tree against the dark sky that is now sprinkling down small snowflakes. Skates zip across clean ice, horns honk, people bustle by, and the cold crisp air fills your lungs as the city comes alive. This scene attracts thousands of people every year to New York City during the holiday season. With 125 million people visiting each year, the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree has become a staple for NYC and a “World-Wide symbol of Christmas,” according to the Rockefeller website. While people come from all over to enjoy the tree, many do not know the history of this annual tradition. It all started in December 1931 in the midst of the Great Depression. Workers at Rockefeller Center decided to pool what little money they had together to buy a Christmas tree in an effort to raise spirits. This tree was a 20-foot high balsam fir Christmas tree decorated with garland made by their families. Two years later, it was made an annual tradition and the first official lighting ceremony was held. Although, this was always the most famous public Christmas tree in NYC, it was not the first. In 1912, Madison Square Park put up the first official public Christmas tree as part of a social event to make a Christmas tree available to those who couldn’t afford one.

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When the Founding Fathers Fail Us

Giuliana Carmen, US News Co-Editor

The electoral college was founded in 1787, as the result of a compromise made because of the opposing beliefs of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention. Those who were for the implementation of the electoral college system feared that voters didn’t possess enough knowledge about each candidate to make a valid and educated decision and that they were not worthy of holding the power of directly deciding who would become president. In my view, this was the beginning of the corruption of democracy in the United States, as a system was created to limit the power of the people and their voices. The creation of this system begs the question: why were some delegates so desperate to suppress the opinions of voters in America?

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Amidst an Era of Great Change, One School Remains the Same

Emma Dumitru, Arts Department Co-Editor

The George Washington University Online High School, which is currently celebrating its 10-year anniversary, is one of many online schools that has seen increased enrollment due to the pandemic.

Is online learning just as good as in-person learning? The COVID-19 pandemic has forced thousands of students across the country to shift to a new format of academic instruction, causing virtual learning to step into the spotlight and face both praise and criticism. However, one thing is clear: online schools have gained substantial popularity. 

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UPDATED: Student Council Election Results

Updated with the names of winners underlined.

For the first time, GWUOHS has begun elections for a new Student Council. Students from all high school grades are competing for various roles such as Student Body President, Class President, and Secretary.

Voting ran from Monday, November 30th to Tuesday, December 1st, ending at 8 PM EST.

Student Body President

Lily McLean, junior

Rea Heth, junior

Vice President

Brennan-Pierson Wang, sophomore

Muhammad Chawla, sophomore

Safiye Sabuncuoglu, sophomore

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Fossilized Footprints Give Clues to Human Activity During the Ice Age

Paige P., journalist

Imagine embarking on a risky journey, braving the harsh cold of the latest Ice Age on foot, with a toddler in one arm, surrounded by enormous mammoths and giant sloths. This is exactly what scientists think one young woman and a child experienced over 10,000 years ago, in what is now White Sands National Park in New Mexico. After finding this 1.5 kilometer long trail of fossilized human footprints, the longest that has ever been found from the ice age (427 total footprints to be exact,) scientists were able to analyze 90 specifically. Looking for distinct patterns, measurements, and other details, they uncovered the setting and situation that likely took place there during this time. Due to the remarkable length of the tracks, scientists were able to uncover many specific details of the young woman’s journey.  

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“Live From New York: It’s Saturday Night!” — SNL is Back

Nastia G., Arts Department Co-Editor

In March, coronavirus swept through the world, leaving a destructive trail in its wake. Auditoriums, professional theaters, cinemas, and art galleries were forced to close down to prevent the spread of the virus, as the threat of exposure was high in tightly packed spaces such as these. The arts were essentially forced to shut down. For many, the only way to see other people and stay entertained was through cable television, Netflix, YouTube, and TikTok. While networks and media companies worked tirelessly to provide viewers with sufficient amusement with which to stay busy when the world shut down, this task proved far more difficult than most realize. Even the most well-known television series struggled to deliver entertainment with new episodes. Many networks placed strict COVID-19 regulations in studios to keep actors, technicians, and directors safe. Most shows were postponed until further notice. Live shows faced a particularly brutal beating. To survive, many live shows continued to air from hosts’ and guest stars’ homes via Zoom or Skype. Saturday Night Live’s 45th season ended in sketches recorded and designed by the stars from their own living rooms.

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Nurses on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jillian H., Science Department Co-Editor

Automatic sliding doors blast a concentrated smell of hand sanitizer and icy air throughout each elevator and waiting room. Coughing, hacking, and wheezing greet most who walk in. Magazines are stacked neatly on tables, waiting for a handful of children to ponder through the pages. The clicking of small keys can be heard over the ring of phones from the receptionist’s office. The smell of gum and concentrated coffee meanders all around the lobby, as another child with a nosebleed stumbles through the shiny doors. A sterile atmosphere characterizes the beige and white walls and floors, all of which the harsh white light reflects upon, illuminating the sparkle from last night’s mopping. People of all ages lumber in, their current conditions plastered upon their faces. This was the everyday work atmosphere for most nurses. With the sudden introduction of COVID-19, many nurses now face a different harsh reality. 

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