Category: Miscellaneous

How Friendships Have Changed During the Pandemic

Paige P., journalist

It has become clear by now that many aspects of life have changed pre-pandemic to the present. With lockdowns, social restrictions, and the rush of everyday life, many people have found it more challenging to maintain or make new friendships in the traditional sense. Now that much more socializing is done through the internet, many people realize differences in opinions, often political, amongst their friends, colleagues, and family. This has made people really think about the people in their lives they want to spend time and energy on. Throughout the pandemic, there has been plenty of time for self-reflection and contemplation on the people you choose to surround yourself with- do they build you up or tear you down? How do they make you feel about yourself? The answer to these questions should point you in the direction of your true friends.

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Multitudes of Identity

Maya T., journalist

Why can’t people respect that identity is not black and white? Self-identification correlates with how we feel connections with certain groups, communities, and individuals who share the same experiences. However, we still are unique individuals whose identities and commonalities change over time. So why are people so quickly rejected by communities when they may not fit the profile perfectly, and why do people try to force others to identify with something they do not? Why do bisexuals have to be “gay enough” or “straight enough” when they’re really not either? Why is the African American with white parents considered not black or white enough for either racial setting? Why is society so defined by its divisions?

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A Ceremonial Chariot Has Been Discovered Near Pompeii

Nyma E., Global News Co-Editor

Italian archeologists have unveiled a ceremonial chariot near the Roman city of Pompeii. Other chariots, used for travel and work, have been discovered in the area, but this is the first chariot of this kind that has been uncovered near Pompeii, leading to the excitement of archeologists worldwide. 

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The Toddlers & Tablets Epidemic

Giuliana C., US News Department Co-Editor

Gen Alpha. The first generation to be born into a completely digitized world in which they are handed an iPad immediately after they emerge from the womb. They bring the devices to the grocery store, restaurants, and even the dinner table, glued to the screen and unable to look away as if the thousands of pixels set them into a deep hypnotic state. But this excess time spent attached to a screen comes with a price and even some side effects we aren’t fully aware of yet.

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Personal Finance Should Be Required

Emma D., Arts Department Co-Editor

Word Cloud by www.epictop10.com

Taking my high school’s Personal Finance course last semester was one of the best decisions I ever made. Although I was apprehensive about approaching a subject I knew little about at first, I now find myself having acquired a high level of financial literacy. I know how to create a budget, open a bank account, calculate interest, read a stock table and much more. These are skills that will serve me throughout my entire life, especially as I head off to college later this year. 

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GWUOHS Model United Nations Club Members Shine during April 18 Virtual MUN Conference

GW Chronicle,

On Sunday, April 18th, GWUOHS student delegates participated in a Virtual Model United Nations Conference with hundreds of students across the globe. MUN is an educational simulation in which students can learn about international relations, diplomacy, and the United Nations.

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I Am AMERICAN

Julian-Alexandre W., Opinion Editor

As a fourth-generation American of Asian descent, I find it preposterous that I have to justify how American I am. With the insurgence of Asian hate crimes across the nation, which started with the pandemic to the atrocious shootings in Atlanta, the reported attacks are close to 3,000 incidents. As much as I don’t feel the flight, I am undeniably forced to hear the rhetoric of my people. As many in the Asian and AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) community now live disrupted in fear, doubt, and anger, the stigma of being foreign is painfully real.

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Satellite Mega-Constellations, Hampered Science, and a Cluttered Orbit

Valene McInerney, journalist

Long ago, people would look to the night sky and observe only natural celestial bodies. Artificial lights did not blot and blur their sights, and human-made satellites did not crowd their horizons. Both of these phenomena factor into modern astronomy, but it has only been in the past 19 months that satellites have become a threat to astronomical observation. With the recent surge in satellite launches and the construction of satellite mega-constellations, hobbyists and professional astronomers alike are witnessing what can be a dangerous disruption and distortion of their cosmic viewing. 

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Mankind’s Crucible: What Arthur Miller’s 1953 Masterpiece Taught Us

Nastia Goddard, Arts Department Co-Editor

The Crucible is one of those titles that almost everyone is familiar with or has at least heard of- and for a good reason. Arthur Miller’s 20th-century classic drama tells a brazenly timeless story, though few truly recognize its candid relevance in the modern world. As society becomes increasingly polarized in the digital age, it is easy to brush off the lessons of the past as inapplicable historical lectures. Such thinking is inherently flawed: how can we move forward if we refuse to acknowledge our past? The answers to some of today’s most pressing questions may lie in the text of a play that most high schoolers begrudgingly skim.

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