Author: GW Chronicle

I Am AMERICAN

Julian-Alexandre W., Opinion Editor

As a fourth-generation American of Asian descent, I find it preposterous that I have to justify how American I am. With the insurgence of Asian hate crimes across the nation, which started with the pandemic to the atrocious shootings in Atlanta, the reported attacks are close to 3,000 incidents. As much as I don’t feel the flight, I am undeniably forced to hear the rhetoric of my people. As many in the Asian and AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) community now live disrupted in fear, doubt, and anger, the stigma of being foreign is painfully real.

Continue reading “I Am AMERICAN”

Satellite Mega-Constellations, Hampered Science, and a Cluttered Orbit

Valene McInerney, journalist

Long ago, people would look to the night sky and observe only natural celestial bodies. Artificial lights did not blot and blur their sights, and human-made satellites did not crowd their horizons. Both of these phenomena factor into modern astronomy, but it has only been in the past 19 months that satellites have become a threat to astronomical observation. With the recent surge in satellite launches and the construction of satellite mega-constellations, hobbyists and professional astronomers alike are witnessing what can be a dangerous disruption and distortion of their cosmic viewing. 

Continue reading “Satellite Mega-Constellations, Hampered Science, and a Cluttered Orbit”

Mankind’s Crucible: What Arthur Miller’s 1953 Masterpiece Taught Us

Nastia Goddard, Arts Department Co-Editor

The Crucible is one of those titles that almost everyone is familiar with or has at least heard of- and for a good reason. Arthur Miller’s 20th-century classic drama tells a brazenly timeless story, though few truly recognize its candid relevance in the modern world. As society becomes increasingly polarized in the digital age, it is easy to brush off the lessons of the past as inapplicable historical lectures. Such thinking is inherently flawed: how can we move forward if we refuse to acknowledge our past? The answers to some of today’s most pressing questions may lie in the text of a play that most high schoolers begrudgingly skim.

Continue reading “Mankind’s Crucible: What Arthur Miller’s 1953 Masterpiece Taught Us”

Women Face the Brunt of Unemployment, Making Up 100% of Job Losses in December

Danielle Chan, Newsletter Co-Editor

The Covid-19 pandemic has driven many out of the workforce and into unemployment. Despite both men and women facing a drastic loss of jobs and economic instability, women have been disproportionately taking a much more devastating hit in the labor force. As opposed to the Great Recession, in which 70% of men working primarily in manufacturing and construction industries lost their jobs, the economic and financial crisis created by the pandemic is nearly two times as worse as what America faced from 2007-2009.

Continue reading “Women Face the Brunt of Unemployment, Making Up 100% of Job Losses in December”

The San Francisco Solution

Lily McLean, editor-in-chief

The San Francisco Unified School District has many problems, but the one it has chosen to target in recent weeks is the issue of whether or not the names of various schools should be changed to address issues of racism. The School Board’s answer? Yes, they should

As SFUSD’s 57,000 students continue to learn from a distance, the Board has announced a plan to rename 44 of its schools. In a widely-shared spreadsheet, anonymous contributors have shared notes on the rationale for renaming schools, from Abraham Lincoln High to El Dorado Elementary.

Continue reading “The San Francisco Solution”

A Lack Positive LGBTQ+ Representation in Modern Television

Kathryn Loschert, journalist

Television has become one of the most common American pastimes. Whether this means watching an episode of your favorite TV show or finding a new show to watch over the weekend, most people would agree that television is a strong part of their lives.  Despite the variety of shows available, the casts tend to be similar.  They lack diversity, especially characters who are members of the LGBTQ+ community.  It is important for us to increase television representation to educate audiences and give representation to minority groups.

Continue reading “A Lack Positive LGBTQ+ Representation in Modern Television”

Why Your Smoke Alarms May Not Go Off During a House Fire

Paige Putnam, journalist

Note: This topic is very important to me, as I recently experienced a significant house fire and our smoke alarms did not go off. 

Take a moment and think to yourself: when was the last time you checked the batteries of the smoke alarms in your home? Did you ever wonder if by some off chance they may not go off if your house was on fire, even with brand new batteries? Believe it or not, this does happen, and more often than you might think. There are actually two different types of smoke detectors, ionization detectors, and photoelectric detectors. Ionization smoke detectors detect particles of fast-paced open flame fires and photoelectric detectors detect smoke particles from fires that smolder for a long period of time before turning into open flames. Depending on where in a house a fire starts, how fast it spreads, and the type of fire it is, it could take up to hours to see or smell smoke. If smoke alarms do go off, individuals will often see or smell smoke before they hear the alarm. The type of fire alarm and its location in a house also affects the likelihood of whether it will go off or not.

Continue reading “Why Your Smoke Alarms May Not Go Off During a House Fire”

The Educational and Developmental Importance of Having Creative Outlets

Maya Tuckman, journalist

Skills like mathematics, writing and literature, science, history, and geography are considered a fundamental part of functioning in the “real world” because of their practical applications and are therefore an essential part of the educational system. However, the significance of creative programs is frequently overlooked, and sometimes even belittled. Many struggle to recognize the essential role that creative outlets and crafts play in both development and education.

Continue reading “The Educational and Developmental Importance of Having Creative Outlets”

The Psychological Impact of COVID-19

Maya Tuckman, journalist

While the health, economic, and social impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic appear to be the most urgent issues in current global society, mental health risks during quarantine isolation, loss of loved ones, and other financial, social, and familial struggles exemplify a rising personal conflict. Stress and isolation evoke unusually harmful psychological consequences that, since the start of lockdown, have progressively exacerbated the condition of nationwide mental health and intensified negative circumstances for those already struggling with mental illnesses like anxiety, addiction, depression, and more.

Continue reading “The Psychological Impact of COVID-19”