Month: June 2020

An Introductory Guide for Understanding Black Lives Matter

Alexa W., Senior Reporter

As a white person, I understand that I will never understand, but I stand with you. I want to preface this article by saying that this piece is intended for white readers.  It is not black people’s jobs to educate us about systematic racism, white privilege, police brutality, or any of the racial issues affecting them, and they shouldn’t have to.  Right now, black people are leading a fight for their rights to life, justice, and equality.  My intent in writing this article is to educate you all in the same ways that I have been educating myself–by providing you with information about white privilege, systematic racism, police brutality, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and ways that white people can help support this movement.  My goal in doing this is to amplify black voices and support their fight

Continue reading “An Introductory Guide for Understanding Black Lives Matter”

Student Guide to Academic Writing

Emma D., journalist

Are you the kind of student that does not look forward to having to write academic essays? If so, you might think that this type of writing requires skills that only the best writers possess. However, this could not be further from the truth. As a member of the George Washington University Online High School’s Finer Things Club, I was given the special opportunity to present a writing workshop to my school. Being a GWUOHS student for four years has given me countless opportunities to write a variety of academic essays, and as such, about a month ago, I shared my knowledge of how to approach academic writing with staff and students in a formal presentation. Now, I would like to pass on the content of my presentation to you, our GW Chronicle readers, to show you how academic writing assignments are not as hard as they seem.

Continue reading “Student Guide to Academic Writing”

Protests Erupt Across the US After the Death of George Floyd

Nyma E., Senior Reporter

On May 25, 2020, George Floyd was murdered by a Derek Chauvin, a Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and forty-six seconds. Although Floyd and multiple bystanders repeatedly told Chauvin that Floyd was unable to breathe, Chauvin did not get off of Floyd’s neck, which led to Floyd suffocating and dying while in the custody of the Minneapolis Police Department. Protests have erupted across the country due to racial injustice demonstrated by this incident and many others. Many of these peaceful protests have turned very violent, prompting the police and National Guard to get involved. 

Continue reading “Protests Erupt Across the US After the Death of George Floyd”